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Milo Project From Lionhead Studios

Project Milo: Creepy or Crazy Awesome?

Before I even got the chance to touch down in LA last week, gaming news began pouring out of E3, and one of the biggest conversation starters was Milo. Milo is a program brought to you by Lionhead Studios and Peter Molyneux (of Fable fame), which allows you to interact with an artificially intelligent boy on screen. Personally, I don't know what to think! On one hand, the technology it takes to create such a complex program boggles the mind, but on the other, it's a little on the creepy side. Take a look at the demo that came out of the Xbox 360 press conference yesterday and tell me what you think.

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Chim Chim 6 years
a bit pedophile-ish but if they use the interaction in game for the social(not the anti social) this would be such an awesome experience...I now see what is going to be the norm in 20 years for my 3 year old son...
Kaizykat Kaizykat 6 years
When the software develops to what was in the promotional video, I will be amazed. Sure, it might not be completely possible to do today, but maybe five, no doubt ten years down the road I wouldn't be surprised if it was entirely possible. That being said, I love the idea of Milo. It seems like more of an interactive toy than a game, but either way it seems extraordinary. I think that his technology would be amazing if applied to computers. Just think about it. Many computers today come with a built in webcam and microphone. But then, this technology is beginning to break the wall that so many science fiction writers and the like have delved into: When does a program become more than a program? When does a program have life? What comes with this life? Does a program's "life" have the same value of a human? How does one measure a life? It's a lot to think about, honestly.
Sasseefrass Sasseefrass 6 years
So apparently the people that got some hands-on time with the game aren't as impressed with Milo's voice recognition capabilities: http://gamer.blorge.com/2009/06/07/exposed-natel-milo-smoke-and-mirrors-by-peter-molyneux/ Hopefully it's just a beta issue and not indicative of the full release.
Sasseefrass Sasseefrass 6 years
My kids will love it. I'm not interested in the game itself as much for myself, however, it represents some huge potential for future games. Can you imagine what this means for rpgs if every NPC you interacted with could respond this way? I have a feeling this will be one of those landmark games that, while not necessarily spectacular in and of itself, will be the beginning of a whole new way of gaming. Cool. Hopefully it delivers.
CoralAmber CoralAmber 6 years
As interactive entertainment it seems cool, but it's the extra features like knowing your schedule and offering reminders or suggestions that will keep people coming back. I think it would be cool if we got to design our own characters and settings too.
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