Skip Nav
Beauty News
I Curled My Hair With the New $550 Dyson Airwrap, and Here’s What I Really Think
Halloween
Makeup Revolution Just Bottled the Blood of Your Enemies in Highlighter Form
Rihanna
Scared of Black Lipstick? Rihanna's New Lip Paint Might Just Change Your Mind
Beauty News
Tarte Is Turning 18 and Inviting You to the Party With Deep Discounts
Is Dove Cruelty Free
Beauty News
Attention, Animal-Lovers: Dove Just Made a HUGE Announcement

Study: Phthalates May Increase Diabetes Risk in Women

Study Links Phthalates to an Increased Risk in Diabetes

A new study links phthalates, a common ingredient in the beauty aisle, to a higher risk of diabetes in women. Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital discovered that those with larger levels of certain types of phthalates (mono-benzyl and mono-isobutyl) in their urine were at twice the risk of diabetes. And di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), which has been found in some fragrances, may increase the possibility of diabetes up to 70 percent. "This is an important first step in exploring the connection between phthalates and diabetes," said lead scientist Dr. Tamarra James-Todd.

Companies use this "plasticizer" to preserve the scent in skin care products, give hair spray movement, and diminish cracking in nail polish. But phthalates have garnered negative attention as they are thought to mimic and disrupt hormones. Currently the FDA has no official regulations regarding the chemical in beauty, but they do advise manufacturers to choose safer alternatives to di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) or DEHP when it comes to their inclusion in certain drug and biologic products. Keep reading for more.

UK-based Cosmetic Toiletry and Perfumery Association has responded to the findings, stating that some of the phthalates mentioned in the study aren't often found in personal care products. Even Dr. James-Todd acknowledges further examination is required. "We know that in addition to being present in personal care products, phthalates also exist in certain types of medical devices and medication that is used to treat diabetes and this could also explain the higher level of phthalates in diabetic women. So overall, more research is needed," she said.

How to identify a phthalate? Look for abbreviations on the back of your products. DBP, DEP (diethyl phthalate), and DMP (dimethyl phthalate) could be in your shampoos, deodorants, and lotions. Also, be suspicious of the term "fragrance." Companies don't have to list the phthalates when using this catch-all term. Although the latest research isn't quite conclusive, expect to see more findings on the great phthalate debate for months to come.

Image Source: Thinkstock
From Our Partners
Beachwaver Styling Products 2018
Meghan Markle Australia Royal Tour Ponytail October 2018
Pat McGrath Holiday 2018
A Star Is Born Beauty Looks
What Hairstyles Does the Dyson Airwrap Create?
Deciem Reopens 2018
Dyson Airwrap Review
Herbal Essences Inclusive Packaging
OPI The Nutcracker and Four Realms Collection
Is Dove Cruelty Free
Tarte Birthday Sale
Post Malone Haircut 2018
From Our Partners
Latest Beauty
All the Latest From Ryan Reynolds