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Best Schitt's Creek Episodes

These 10 Schitt's Creek Episodes Are Simply the Best

I admit it: in the past year, I've become a Schitt's Creek evangelist. And, as it turns out, I'm not the only one. The witty, surprisingly heartfelt sitcom about a wealthy family who lose everything and move to a rural town has gained a huge following in the past year or so, in large part thanks to its debut of back episodes on Netflix. Over the course of its five seasons so far, the show has had plenty of memorable episodes and even more iconic, deliciously meme-able quotes — so many that it's hard to narrow it down to just 10. But that's exactly what we've done: picked out the 10 funniest, sweetest, and smartest episodes. If you haven't caught up with the latest episodes, be forewarned: spoilers ahead! But if you're already waiting for the sixth (and final!) season, check out our chronological selection of the Schitt's Creek episodes that are simply the best.

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The first season of Schitt's Creek isn't home to what most fans will call the "best episodes": it's clearly a show that's still finding its way, and the comedy is a little sharper and meaner than it is in later seasons. But this episode is an early gem. Moira is approached to do a commercial for fruit wine and promptly melts down, which gives us a surprisingly sweet insight into the Roses' marriage. Meanwhile, David thinks he's dying but realizes he's actually having a panic attack, and he accompanies Alexis to a superawkward yoga class to try to relax. Bonus: a full-fledged introduction to Catherine O'Hara's deliciously daffy accent-shifting for Moira.

No one realized how funny shredded (or, excuse me, "broken") cheese could be until this episode, in which Moira tries to prove she can cook dinner for her family, with David's help. The enchiladas scene alone is priceless, but the subplots — Johnny trying to find office space amid typical town shenanigans and Alexis making a major romantic decision between Ted and Mutt — are pretty great character beats, too.

The last episode of season two really shows how far the Roses have come since first arriving in town. Johnny and Moira's anniversary dinner gets accidentally crashed, first by a couple they knew in their old life, then by Roland and Jocelyn. But instead of joining their old friends in mocking Schitt's Creek, they stand up for the town and their new friends, choosing their new life over the old one. Add to that the sweet moment of the whole cast dancing at Mutt's barn party at the end, and it's clear this is a major turning point for the show — and it just gets better from here on out.

The comedy in this episode is a pitch-perfect microcosm of what makes Schitt's Creek great. You've got Moira's haughty diva antics at the worst possible moment (when she has to man the motel front desk and offends a guest), Johnny's sweet but overbearing attempts to be a good dad (by secretly writing Alexis's paper for her and getting her accused of plagiarism), and David falling to bits when he has to actually articulate details of a plan (to open a new store in town). But their discomfort is our joy, and everyone actually learns something by the end. Plus, this is the episode that introduces viewers — and David — to handsome businessman Patrick, launching a fan-favorite storyline.

Both Rose siblings hit major milestones in the sweetest way in this episode, but not without some bumps along the way. Alexis is getting ready to finally graduate from high school, but it seems like Moira is more interested in her Jazzagals performance, and in a Sixteen Candles-esque plot, it seems like everyone's forgotten David's birthday. But the episode's sweet denouement, in which Alexis gets some surprise support and David finds himself on a surprise date, is incredibly emotionally satisfying.

At first glance, it's a classic three-pronged episode of Schitt's Creek: Alexis tries — with hilariously mixed results — to wrangle Johnny and Stevie in rebranding the motel, while Moira accidentally becomes the secret-keeper about the sex of the Schitts' new baby and David is wary of Patrick's idea to bring business to the store by hosting an open mic night. The episode's last scene, featuring a sweet acoustic cover of Tina Turner's "Simply the Best," is what has turned it into an iconic episode and a reminder of the show's perfect blend of salty and sweet.

Season four was the year where Schitt's Creek began leaning hard into being less a fish-out-of-water comedy and more a family comedy with a side of rom-com. The season finale, in particular, is pure rom-com joy. Alexis's first big PR event, a "singles week" event to attract tourism, is timed pretty badly, seeing as she's just told her now-taken ex-boyfriend that she's still in love with him. Meanwhile, Patrick drops the big L-bomb on David, who needs some time to react. The end of the episode ends with two swoon-worthy, epic romantic moments, packed with sincerity and emotion without losing that quirkiness that elevates this show above the rest.

Schitt's Creek doesn't do drama very often, but when it does, it does it beautifully, as evidenced by this powerful episode. It starts out with a sitcommy misunderstanding, when David invites Patrick's parents for a surprise party, but takes a dramatic turn when it's revealed Patrick hasn't come out to them yet. As Patrick worries about their possible reaction and David tries to help, the episode digs into some deep, gut-wrenching emotions before its conclusion.

Fresh off one of the most dramatic episodes of the series comes one of the most epically emotional. Johnny has a health scare, sending Moira and Stevie into a panic that shows just how much they really all do care about each other, snark and arguments aside. Patrick takes David on a hike, and David promptly is his fussy self until he realizes the real purpose of the trip.

Directed by series star and cocreator Dan Levy, the season five finale is packed with classic Schitt's Creek goodness — plus musical numbers! Stevie gets the chance to shine in the spotlight, while David and Patrick get frustrated when their news gets out before they have the chance to announce it themselves, and Alexis finds herself surprised at the idea that she might miss her family when she leaves for a trip. Although it ends with a Moira-centric cliffhanger, for the most part, this episode is a triumphant, satisfying moment that shows just how much these characters have grown.

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