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Fab Read: . . . Isms: Understanding Fashion

I'm always one to dig a little deeper when it comes to understanding where certain styles and fashions originate. If you're curious like me, check out the upcoming . . . Isms: Understanding Fashion ($12), by Mairi MacKenzie. In this cute, pocket-sized book, Mairi explores which fashions — such as Neoclassicism, Industrialism, Punk, and Existentialism — came first, and which trends will come next. Cool. Also included are her theories on how culture has played a huge role on influencing fashion cycles and trends. Why did '70s music trigger the popularity of dog collars and safety-pinned clothes — Sex Pistols, anyone?


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leslievanhouten leslievanhouten 7 years
Ism's in my opinion are not good. A person should not believe in an ism, he should believe in himself. I quote John Lennon, "I don't believe in Beatles, I just believe in me." Sex Pistols were influenced by the trends. Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood already had the shop selling dog collars and safety pin clothing (and all sorts of other fetish-y anti fashion). The Sex Pistols had the music and the talent, but McLaren managed the look and the style, using the band to promote the store
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