Skip Nav
Cannes Film Festival
Every Can't-Miss Look That's Hit the Cannes Red Carpet So Far
Street Style
Ladies Aren't Wearing Clutches Like They Used to Anymore
DSTLD
I Finally Gave Mom Jeans a Try, and I Have to Admit, I Didn't Hate Them

Video — Watch Anna Wintour Talk Alexander McQueen's Trickle-Down Effect, Mirroring Devil Wears Prada Movie Quote

Video — Watch Anna Wintour Talk Alexander McQueen's Trickle-Down Effect, Mirroring Devil Wears Prada Movie Quote

>> On Tuesday in London, Anna Wintour previewed the Costume Institute's Alexander McQueen exhibit, set to go with this year's gala and opening May 4. A selection of the pieces that will be on view — primarily from the McQueen archives — can be seen here, and Wintour spoke to the BBC about the designer's legacy: "His influence is everywhere. I always remember, very soon after we lost him, talking to a number of designers — we were all in New York at the time — about how huge his influence had been on them, how his runway shows really taught them to be daring, and that the runway wasn’t just about a nice beige suit, that it was a place to explore the imagination and to take risks and to dare. That might sound sort of difficult to understand, maybe to the average woman, but the effects of that imagination had an extraordinary trickle-down effect, so what you may see looking very extreme on the runway would end up in people's closets in a much more understandable way."

Planned or not (although she has seen the film), we couldn't help but notice how Wintour's words in that last sentence parallel those of Miranda Priestly (whose character is supposedly based on Wintour) in The Devil Wears Prada. In one well-known scene, Priestly also talk designers' trickle-down effects: "You go to your closet and you select . . . I don't know . . . that lumpy blue sweater, for instance, because you're trying to tell the world that you take yourself too seriously to care about what you put on your back. But what you don't know is that that sweater is not just blue, it's not turquoise. It's not lapis. It's actually cerulean. And you're also blithely unaware of the fact that in 2002, Oscar de la Renta did a collection of cerulean gowns. And then I think it was Yves Saint Laurent . . . wasn't it, who showed cerulean military jackets? And then cerulean quickly showed up in the collections of eight different designers. And then it, uh, filtered down through the department stores and then trickled on down into some tragic Casual Corner where you, no doubt, fished it out of some clearance bin. However, that blue represents millions of dollars and countless jobs, and it's sort of comical how you think that you've made a choice that exempts you from the fashion industry when, in fact, you're wearing the sweater that was selected for you by the people in this room from a pile of stuff."

Join The Conversation
Candid Behind the Scenes Photos From the 2011 Met Gala
Anna Wintour Is Calling the Next Big Designer Trend
Anna Wintour and Amy Schumer Switch Lives in Vogue Video
PPR Interviewing CEO Candidates For Christopher Kane
Kate Middleton Vanessa Seward Dress at Christmas Party 2016
Doo-Ri Chung Named Creative Director of Vince
Anna Wintour Lands a Magazine Cover — Wears Her Sunglasses, of Course
Hillary Clinton's White Suit at DNC 2016
Successful Women Who Failed (video)
Kate Middleton's Wedding Dress
From Our Partners
Latest Fashion
All the Latest From Ryan Reynolds