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Egg Wash Recipe

Why Egg Wash Rocks, and How to Use It

If you've ever dabbled in baking, then chances are you've encountered egg wash in recipes before. Simply put, egg wash is a term that refers to the emulsion of egg and a liquid — for a basic version, whisk a large egg with one tablespoon of water until smooth — and it's used for a couple of reasons and a multitude of recipes.

Learn more about egg wash's uses — and how to stretch it further! — when you keep reading.

Egg can either be employed as a glue-like substance to seal homemade ravioli, wontons, or dumplings or brushed on the surface of rich breads (think brioche and challah), biscuits, and scones to make them more visually enticing by enhancing browning and adding a glossy sheen. It can also be brushed atop lattice and double-crust pies, as well as sugar cookies, to help adhere a sprinkling of coarse sugar and enhance browning.

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While egg wash can be versatile, it can also seem a bit wasteful, as few recipes use more than a tablespoon or so. Luckily, leftovers can be repurposed in a couple ways:

  • Freeze in a resealable plastic bag, and thaw the next time you need egg wash.
  • Add extra eggs, a splash of cream, and a pinch of salt; then whisk together and scramble up for breakfast.

What do you do when you find yourself with too much egg wash?

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