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How to Deadhead Flowers

Garden Therapy: Don't Forget to Deadhead


Deadheading can seem daunting, but it's a simple process that will keep your flowers looking fantastic and blooming all season long. By removing the dead flowers, you're tricking the plant into producing more buds, but don’t just pull off the petals. To properly deadhead flowers, be sure to discard spent blossoms as well as seed pods, which are located at the center or just behind the flower. Some people like to get rid of the dead bits by pinching them off, while others just use gardening shears. It's a personal preference, but either method is fine — I generally use my fingers, but will reach for the shears with sticky plants like petunias, as well as for prickly ones such as roses. How do you know when a flower is dead? Dead flowers often turn brown or colorless and dry up. Don't worry if you accidentally remove a blossom that's not completely at the end of its life, a new stem and flower (or two) should grow in its absence.

Join The Conversation
GlowingMoon GlowingMoon 7 years
I'm a novice gardener, and I learning the value of deadheading my flowering ornamentals. It seems that timing is important to keep the plant continuing with blooms.
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