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Catholic Church Offers Indulgences Once Again

"Why are we bringing it back? Because there is sin in the world."

With that matter-of-fact answer one Catholic bishop in Brooklyn explained why the Church has decided to start peddling indulgences —or, get-out-of-purgatory free cards!

Technically believers haven't been able to purchase indulgences outright since 1857. But, you can exchange a charitable contribution and confession, or a combination of other acts for reduced time in purgatory. According to the Church, sinners must face punishment in purgatory before they make it to heaven.

Plenary indulgences, which erase all the time a sinner must spend in purgatory, only come around every so often. Right now they're being offered in conjunction with a yearlong celebration of St. Paul, and they're available for you, or someone you know (dead or alive).

So are Catholics lining up to participate in something as confusing as this? According to the New York Times, many are eager for the opportunity to "do something Catholic" in these modern times.

Source

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Grandpa Grandpa 8 years
nenamarie, thank you very much for your kind thoughts :heart:
Grandpa Grandpa 8 years
PeachyKeer, the Slate article may not reflect your opinion, but it pretty much reflects mine
PeachyKeen19 PeachyKeen19 8 years
These are just excerpts from a Slate article, not my opinion: Rejecting the teachings of a council is a bit like being a Republican in favor of higher taxes: You have to wonder why you're still a member of the club. "The Second Vatican Council is the religion of man, of man put in the place of God," the British Williamson told a U.K. paper. "Deep down what it means is that it's a new religion, dressed up to look like the Catholic religion, but it's not the Catholic religion." Pope Benedict's decision to try to bring the Lefebvrists back into the fold was entirely his own. The pope believes he has a special responsibility to promote unity among Catholics—including those who have fallen away from the church. Progressive Catholics are accustomed to being called "cafeteria Catholics" because of the perception that they pick and choose among Catholic teachings, accepting some while ignoring others. But here it is the progressives who are claiming foul and the right wing that is charged with its own bizarre brand of cafeteria Catholicism. Some wish to deny the church's ban on ordaining women; others wish to deny Vatican II's teachings on separation of church and state. And nenamarie is right.
nenamarie nenamarie 8 years
I love you Grandpa. To everyone else: This isn't a new tradition, it's one of the Catholic Sacraments. It's just getting special attention as it is a special time in the religious calendar. And I think it's a good thing that we discuss this stuff; it helps us understand other people's beliefs, even if they aren't our own.
vanitypot vanitypot 8 years
there has always been sin in the world and only LOVE can conquer sin, not indulgences :| i'm a Catholic and i am faithful to what i believe in but i am not totally agreeable to what the bishop says here.. it's highly doubtful and may i quote, confusing o.O this needs a lot of dialogue before the bishop makes any concrete decisions/statements..
Grandpa Grandpa 8 years
Has anyone ever remember the New York Times describe the hypocrisy of the interpretation of the Koran used by radical wahabieists, or the hypocrisy of imams who do not publicly and vociferously condemn that perversion, and issue fatwas of said condemnation
PeachyKeen19 PeachyKeen19 8 years
slate.com/id/2210151/
ShelleyHFan ShelleyHFan 8 years
Oh and I'm in agreement with Grandpa...I think this, some of the posters here, are essentially bashing practicing Catholics and Catholicism. People aren't posting questions or having and intellectual debate on theology. A lot of people just made sarcastic remarks or "roll your eyes" off the cuff comments. Or so it seems.
ShelleyHFan ShelleyHFan 8 years
Lastly, "Getting Catholics back into confession, in fact, was one of the motivations for reintroducing the indulgence. In a 2001 speech, Pope John Paul described the newly reborn tradition as “a happy incentive” for confession."
ShelleyHFan ShelleyHFan 8 years
this may help hausfrau: "In exchange for certain prayers, devotions or pilgrimages in special years, a Catholic can receive an indulgence, which REDUCES or erases that punishment instantly, with no formal ceremony or sacrament." And..."There are partial indulgences, which reduce purgatorial time by a CERTAIN NUMBER of DAYS or years, and plenary indulgences, which eliminate all of it, until another sin is committed. You can get one for yourself, or for someone who is dead."
chatondeneige chatondeneige 8 years
Those are two different ways of phrasing it, but the same thing. Murder is wrong.
stephley stephley 8 years
"you don't follow church doctrine if you kill anyone." "abortion is murder, according to the Catholic church. Supporting murder of innocents goes against church doctrines." You've said two different things - which one is it?
chatondeneige chatondeneige 8 years
:oy: Stephley, abortion is murder, according to the Catholic church. Supporting murder of innocents goes against church doctrines. I am sure of that.
stephley stephley 8 years
Really? You're certain of that?
chatondeneige chatondeneige 8 years
stephley, you don't follow church doctrine if you kill anyone. Period.
stephley stephley 8 years
G'pa, I would have liked that disclaimer much earlier. But it explains a lot.
stephley stephley 8 years
You brought up abortion. I hear a lot of intellectualizing in order to support the moral positions you support and to shrug off that which you do not. It smacks of the 'cafeteria catholicism' that liberals are accused of: life is sacred and the Church is clear when we're talking about being pro-choice, but there's wiggle room if it's a war to support or a criminal to be killed. And none of this has anything to do with indulgences.
Grandpa Grandpa 8 years
One more thing, I should make clear, I am explaining Catholic dogma here, not defending it. I am not a practicing Catholic, a doctor of philosophy or theology, so please take my statements in that vein. I consider myself knowledgable but not authorative, on this subject.
Grandpa Grandpa 8 years
Stephaly, you said "If Catholics marched in lock step, the war in Iraq would have far fewer enthusiastic supporters". I was pointing out that there are times you can disagree with the pope, and still be within church doctrine, and times you can disagree, but are REQUIRED to follow church teachings.
Grandpa Grandpa 8 years
The theological philosophers of the church. fall into two camps; the Augustinian/Platonic approach and the Thomistic/ Socratic branch, with the approach of St. Thomas Aquinas the mainstream. St Thomas’s seminal work is “Summa Theologica” . He is considered by many Catholics to be the Church's greatest theologian and philosopher. He is considered the “best” of the 33 “Doctors of the Church”. It his teachings used in the seminaries around the world. “Summa Theologica”, is probably misnamed. It is philosophy more then theology. Since abortion came up, let me explain the differences in philosophy between the Augustinian and Thomistic schools. St. Augustine felt that a God infuse an immortal soul at time of conception, while St. Thomas felt that the infusion took place at the time the fetus took on a human form. BUT, and this a BIG BUT, since there was no way of knowing when the soul was infused that the approach of St. Augustine must be taken as to when a fetus is a human life with a soul, and therefore to be protected. That approach is church dogma, and therefore not something that individual Catholics have a choice in following (according to the pope, and speaking “ex cathedra”).
stephley stephley 8 years
"Stephley, I think you are confusing the Pope speaking out on "social justice", and Speaking "ex cathedra"." I think you're trying to trivialize that with which you do not fully agree - and I never referred to infallibility, that was someone else.
Grandpa Grandpa 8 years
Carrie Sue, by definition Catholics are Christians. I am defining Christianity as a “monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior”
Grandpa Grandpa 8 years
Stephley, I think you are confusing the Pope speaking out on "social justice", and Speaking "ex cathedra". The only time the church claims infallibility is when the Pope speaks “”ex cathedra” and that is only on “faith and morals”. Now, I do not want to get drawn into an argument as to whether or not who is right in those cases, suffice it to say that those who hold themselves in communion with the church have to accept those teachings/pronouncements, or the church considers them “outside” the church. The church is now and for several decades split between the liberal wing and conservative wing, in a number of fundamental ways. The liberal wing is strongest here in the U.S., Western Europe, and parts of South America. The last two popes are from the conservative wing. Yet no matter what the positions of either side on any issue, they all agree the Pope is the final arbiter on faith and morals. I think the best example is in the area of capitol punishment. The Catholic Church is against capitol punishment in it’s application. Theologically speaking the church has ruled that the state has a right to execute individuals under certain defined circumstances.
stephley stephley 8 years
It's 'tenets' of the faith, not tenants (the major tenets of the Catholic faith are in the Apostles Creed); the pastor leads the parish, he's not the new priest, the foreign priest or the visiting priest. Catholics do not march in lock step - there are many lively debates going on all the time. Joe Biden has come under severe criticism from conservatives, yet he and Pope John Paul II met at least four times and Biden attended the Pope's funeral. If the Vatican felt he was a sinner, Biden would not have been allowed such a high profile relationship. If Catholics marched in lock step, the war in Iraq would have far fewer enthusiastic supporters: Pope John Paul II and top Vatican officials are unleashing a barrage of condemnations of a possible U.S. military strike on Iraq, calling it immoral, risky and a "crime against peace." President Bush, who has rarely met with opponents of his Iraqi stand in recent months, did receive an emissary from John Paul last week. Upon returning to Rome, the emissary, Cardinal Pio Laghi, said American officials had been friendly but that "friendship is not enough." John Paul has insisted that war is a "defeat for humanity" and that a preventive strike against Iraq is neither legally nor morally justified.
chatondeneige chatondeneige 8 years
lilegwene, it was a joke. I just don't think you can call yourself practicing if you're constantly preaching against one of the tenants of the faith.
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