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What Do You Think Is the Most Annoying Phrase?

Oxford University has just released their list of the Top Ten Annoying Phrases. Some of these skew a little toward English-isms, and many of them are just outright grammatical mistakes. I find many of these irritating, though. What do you think is the most annoying phrase? Did they leave anything out?

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GREGWASHERE2 GREGWASHERE2 8 years
Your ALL right and here's another- "10-4 good buddy"
Isista Isista 8 years
Also I agree about the "not a problem." It's not introducing negativity. It's saying that it really wasn't a problem for me to do whatever it is you thanked me for; I generally use it when trying to tell someone that thanks are not necessary. I mean, if it's just a pet peeve or whatever, that's fine. I guess I just see it differently as well.
Isista Isista 8 years
"With all due respect" only because damn near everyone who uses the phrase NEVER implies respect. It's just a way to save face when they insult their conversation partner.
Smilesp Smilesp 8 years
Any phrase that isn't grammatically correct or phrases that people don't say the right way...the "I could care less" thing drives me nuts too Greggie!
Greggie Greggie 8 years
I don't think pointing out that what you did wasn't a problem introduces negativity, I think it does the opposite.
skigurl skigurl 8 years
i hate "vis a vis"
The-City-Girl The-City-Girl 8 years
But why would it be a problem? Why introduce negativity? The gracious response is "You're welcome!"
lynbird lynbird 8 years
As a design student I LOATHE "think outside the box." I've had instructors laugh people out of class for using the phrase. Also "Really?!" Yes, really. I just said it.
Greggie Greggie 8 years
I see "no problem" much differently. When I thank someone for going out of their way for me and they answer with "no problem!" I'm relieved. It means it wasn't a problem for them.
The-City-Girl The-City-Girl 8 years
OH I remembered another one that's related to the one pink_elephant mentioned. I HATE when people say, "No problem," or "Not a problem" when you thank them. Let me see if I can articulate why. . . It's mostly because it's like, "I wasn't saying there was a problem, I was thanking you for doing whatever you did for me! By you saying 'not a problem' it's actually like you're saying that it might have been perceived as a problem, and kind of putting a negative spin on it." Why can't the person be more gracious and just say, "You're welcome!" or "My pleasure!" Or if you want something more casual, just "sure!" It's not the "No problem" phrase itself I don't like--it's a perfectly fine response to an apology, but not a thank you. I can't really fully explain it without sounding ornery lol, but it just irks me!
sarah-t-a sarah-t-a 8 years
"with all due respect" come on, just tell them your insulting them
Norajohanna Norajohanna 8 years
"Think outside the box", definitely! Oh, and of course: "It's been four years already! She needs to..."
pink-elephant pink-elephant 8 years
Ugh, I hate how one guy I work with says "Not A Problem" alll the time. I think it's actually a nervous tic he has. the worst part was that for a while I was around him so much, I would begin to use it too!
spaghetina spaghetina 8 years
I HATE "I could care less." Oh, really? You could? So then whatever's bothering you really does bother you, eh?
Greggie Greggie 8 years
"None of the ones above bother me, nor dose "I couldn't care less"." I didn't say "I couldn't care less" was a bothersome phrase. I said "I COULD care less" is. People use it in place of "I couldn't care less" when it doesn't mean the same thing. It means the opposite.
Advah Advah 8 years
Momma - I agree!! The other day I had that woman from another department call me "honey" twice over the phone, then calling my co-worker "my darling". But then, most of the people at work don't get my name and just call me by endless variations of it, which is just as exhausting..
winegirlNJ winegirlNJ 8 years
I cannot stand: I'll be out of the office "on tomorrow". Irregardless bugs me too. And when brainy people say "In theory" when they start a sentence... grrrr
Mykie7 Mykie7 8 years
Um, well, Bri, it's like...
Manoukia Manoukia 8 years
All of the above, not only those that are listed, but also what was posted by those of you who commented before me. I don't like phrases and try to avoid them. Other things that make me uncomfortable: the excessive use of "awesome", especially when something is merely good - or, in print, the casual way people deal with spelling and grammar. While I'm slowly getting used to people spelling "definitely" definately, I came across a "deffinatley" recently. Or the use of a preposition instead of a verb - "of" instead of "have", e.g. "who'd of thought". Maybe it's because English is not my first language...
Mykie7 Mykie7 8 years
The phrase SHUT UP needs to be banned unless you really ARE telling someond to SHUT UP. When someone tells you, "There's a hot guy checking you out." The proper response is not "SHUT UP! WHERE?" I HATE it when people use that.
Briandiesel Briandiesel 8 years
I despise the whole "You know what I'm sayin" thing No, I'm completely lost by the 4 words you just said. Definitely confused Also- The "like" thing and "um" thing. If you don't know what you are going to say and need to use "break" words, then why don't you not speak for 10 seconds and figure it all out. Then talk.
kerry520 kerry520 8 years
I've got some peeves... "I don't disagree" because that basically means that you don't really agree but that you also want to one-up the person. Also, I just find it more likable when someone says, "I agree with you and" rather than going so negative to say "I don't disagree, but". ohh ohh and my other one: "Irregardless"... common people, its not a really a word and if you really think about it: its a double negative.
BlondeSugar BlondeSugar 8 years
Any office phrase! "It is what it is" "Think outside the box" "FYI" before a sentence - one of my co-workers actually says "I just want to FYI you..."
doogirl doogirl 8 years
I hate being called "sweetie" too mommaof2!!! "Are you serious" is a good one. But the one I hate the most is what my MIL says to me all the time, "You've got to realize..." Drives me insane!
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