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Kaia Gerber on Her Mom's Best Beauty Advice, 13 Reasons Why and Harry Styles

Kaia Gerber embodies the phrase "#blessed." Genetically, she's been gifted the genes of her mom. Her legs make up most of her body. Her face is soft, sweet, and symmetrical. What would you expect, though, with a mother like that?

Oh, right. Her mother, by the way, is Cindy Crawford. But you probably knew that already.

I joke that when I meet young celebrities or influencers that I could be their mother. (Teen Mom style.) Of course, the joke is on me — there's no way I'm comparing myself to Cindy Crawford. Cindy is arguably the most influential supermodel in the last 30 years; one of the "original five." She made Pepsi cool in the '90s, long before Britney Spears did. (The pre-Jenner era, mind you.) The red Versacé dress she wore to the Academy Awards in 1991 made her a fashion influencer long before the term existed. The woman is known for being flawless — so much so that a 2015 debate ensued over the validity of an "unretouched" photo of her body from a 2013 shoot with Marie Claire Mexico. (Crawford has not commented on the matter.) And she was in a George Michael video! The woman is iconic, to say the very least.

You're probably expecting me to say that Kaia has big shoes to fill. No. She doesn't have shoes to fill — those shoes are gladly being passed down.

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Kaia, 15, is exactly what you'd expect as a teenager. She lights up talking about subjects she's learned about on television, like criminal psychology (yes, really!), as well as new artist Khalid, and 13 Reasons Why. She has a quiet confidence, but like any teenager, trails off at the ends of her sentences. It's refreshing. She isn't overly media trained. She doesn't come off as entitled or spoiled. She's a teenage girl who just happens to have the life she does, and also happens to be the muse for Marc Jacobs.

To celebrate the 10-year anniversary of Daisy Marc Jacobs, the brand has tapped Kaia as the face of their global campaign. I had some time to sit with the model at The Beverly Hills Hotel and discuss everything from the pressure of social media to Harry Styles.

What her mother has taught her about her skin:

Kaia Gerber: My mom has taught me not to overdry my skin. A lot of people make the mistake of doing too much to it. The natural oils are really important. She's taught me about doing enough to it, but not overdoing it.
POPSUGAR: That's smart. Because when I was your age, I was slathering salicylic acid all over my face —
Kaia Gerber: And that's the mistake. That's what I'd do that too if I didn't have her. I've done that before. She's like, "what are you doing." I have it all over my face and she's like, "Kaia, no!" A lot of people feel like they have to do something. Sometimes it's good to just leave it.

What people might not expect her to be passionate about

KG: I'm really passionate about psychology. People wouldn't expect that, but I really want to study criminal psychology.
PS: What got you interested in that?
KG: Criminal Minds! Just binge-watching Criminal Minds, I thought, "oh, that would actually be really interesting." There's a reason behind everything. So not really understanding what happened, but why it happened. And you can apply it to any part of your life. How are you going to learn from something if you don't understand why it happened?

On Harry Styles and the music she's listening to

KG: I'm just really proud of him. I think he's, like, releasing the music he's really proud of. Right now, I'm listening to Khalid on repeat. He's a new artist, he's really good. But when Harry's album comes out . . . he's doing amazing.

Her go-to makeup products

KG: Blush, lip gloss, and an eyelash curler. I'll get ready at my friends' houses and I'm like, "Do you have blush?" and and they're like "No," and I'm like "What do I do?" I use it on my eyes, I use it on my cheeks, I use it everywhere. I use it on my nose. I always have blush on my eyes. It's my thing.

Her first memories of Marc Jacobs

KG: I would always go into my mom's closet and steal anything she had from Marc, whether it was his beauty, or the fragrance, or any clothes that she had. Now that I have my own Marc Jacobs clothes in my closet, it's crazy.

What she's watching

KG: I binge-watch Netflix. I just finished 13 Reasons Why. It's so good. I finished it in one day. I just locked myself in my room and I finished it. And The Get Down is also really good. All of the Netflix Originals are really good, but the issue is they're all available right away, so you just finish them. There's no stopping you!

How she feels about the pressure to be perfect on social media

KG: It's a lot of pressure — thinking how many girls might look up to me — and I really just want to be the role model that they need. I definitely think before I post. But at the same time, social media is the closest a lot of people get to my personality. So I want to show people who I actually am. I'm a regular person. I'm not having this glamorous, crazy life. I think it's cool to show people that. They can see that I'm going to school and have normal friends.

One thing she doesn't do on social media

KG: I try not to be too serious on social media. That's part of it, trying to have fun with it. Don't overthink it. If you like something enough, it's not going to matter what people to comment. If I say, "Someone could say something really mean about this photo and I still love it," then I'll post it. I think other people should go by that too.

Her advice to teens who are struggling with self-confidence in an Instagrammable world

KG: You have to love yourself if you expect other people to be able to love you. When I think about my social media, it's the best version of myself. For people to think this is how people always are, and try to make themselves like that? It's never going to happen, 'cause even those people aren't like that. I try to show people I don't always look perfect, I don't always have full hair, full makeup. That's just not realistic. People should stop comparing themselves. Girls should lift each other up.

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