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Recipes From a Pre-K Class Cookbook on Twitter

We're 0% Shocked That These "Recipes" in a Preschool Cookbook Were Written by Toddlers

I can't remember much about pre-k or kindergarten, but what I can remember is distinct, and of those memories are ones of dictating stories to a class aide with a typewriter for various projects. While creating the art portion of a project, my classmates and I would get called into the hallway one by one by Miss Maryann, who would type everything we said for the written portion of the project (the best example I can remember was being asked to recite an original Mother's Day poem to accompany a handprint flower masterpiece, which still hangs in my mom's basement).

Although the time of the typewriter is mostly in the past, a pre-k class of today was tasked with writing (read: dictating) "recipes" for a class cookbook, and you can basically hear the toddler in the hysterical computer-printed transcriptions.

Shared by Jordan Adams, the uncle of one of the kids in the class, each recipe includes cooking times, ingredients and where to buy them, and instructions — and they're all pretty much downhill from the recipe names on. "My nephew Ethan's pre-k class made a cookbook, and all the kids had to come up with all the recipes," Jordan wrote on Twitter. "So much better than I could've imagined."

"Don't put anything on them because that's how you makes eggs, with nothing."

Ethan, Jordan's nephew, had perhaps the most distinct recipe. Called "Ethan's Eggs," the recipe calls for pancakes, sugar, and Skittles, which you can buy at Texas Roadhouse for $3 — and though the eggs take an hour to prep, the cook time is a cool two seconds.

"First you put the pancakes and then sugar and that's it," Ethan instructs. "You can cook it but you can go to my house and I will give you eggs because my mom makes eggs all the time. You can eat them with a spoon. Don't put anything on them because that's how you makes eggs, with nothing."

Now, if that isn't budding culinary excellence, I'm not sure what is.

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