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Does Green Tea Give You Energy?

Having a Mid-Afternoon Slump? Reach For a Cup of Green Tea — Here's Why

green tea

From classic tea to matcha, green tea seems to be everywhere. Sipping on a cup or two a day can help you with weight loss and cutting back on highly caffeinated beverages, like coffee and soda, while boosting your energy levels.

Green tea has caffeine in it, which is the active ingredient in your favorite energy drinks and coffee. In fact, all tea, unless explicitly labeled as caffeine-free (usually herbal teas), contains some amount of the awakening ingredient. Because of this, green tea can provide you with a boost of energy that helps you get through the day. Studies support this, showing that drinking green tea regularly can help with energy and endurance.

If matcha is more your style than traditional green tea, we have even better news for you. The delicious, finely ground powder is known for its sharp flavor and for its myriad health benefits — antioxidants and disease-fighting properties, among others. When it comes to energy, matcha is head and shoulders above other caffeinated beverages for one simple reason: it won't give you the dreaded caffeine crash because it contains an amino acid (called L-theanine) that reduces anxiety and high blood pressure and fights those coffee jitters.

Although the health benefits of green tea can be tempting, be sure to practice moderation and, most importantly, listen to your body. Green tea can be safely consumed in large amounts (and a higher quantity may even increase the health benefits), but if you have a sensitive stomach, are pregnant, or tend to be caffeine sensitive, limiting your intake is probably a good idea.

Image Source: Pexels / Pixabay
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