If You're Trying to Lose Weight, You Should Probably Stay Away From These Fruits

Fruit is probably one of nature's best snacks: it's portable, it's tasty, it's full of fiber and essential micronutrients, and there are so many options to choose from. However, fruit is still high in fructose, and while it's natural sugar, it can still add up if you are trying to lose weight. We are by no means advocating that you should give up fruit entirely if you are trying to lose weight. Rather, it's important to pay attention to serving sizes and how much fruit you're actually eating; if you're making smoothies in the morning and throwing in a whole banana, a handful of berries, and a date, it can quickly add up.

"I definitely recommend that people who are trying to lose weight be mindful of portions and preparation of fruit," Eliza Savage, RD, dietitian at Middleburg Nutrition in New York City, told POPSUGAR. "An appropriate serving would be one handheld fruit (think: one apple, one peach), one cup of cut fruit (melon, pineapple), or 15 to 17 grapes or cherries." Additionally, a serving of a banana is usually half of a large or medium banana.

Still, if you're looking to cut back on sugars to lose weight, here are some of the fruits you might want to limit or stay away from, according to dietitians. Instead of these fruits mentioned, many dietitians we spoke to recommended low-sugar berries such as raspberries and blueberries and fiber-rich apples.

Canned Fruit in Syrup
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Canned Fruit in Syrup

"Canned fruits can make a perfectly healthy and affordable addition to your diet as long as they aren't packed in sweetened syrup," Jillian Kubala, MS, RD, told POPSUGAR. "Choose fruit canned in water or in its own juice over fruits canned in heavy syrup."

Dried Fruit
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Dried Fruit

"Although small amounts of dried fruit make an excellent snack when combined with a healthy source of fat and protein like nuts or seeds, eating too much can cause weight gain," Jillian said. "Dried fruit is more caloric than whole, fresh fruit and contains more sugar per serving because it is in a condensed, dried form."

Since whole fruit contains water, which will keep you feeling full and hydrated, it's always better to eat whole fruit over its dried counterpart.

All-Fruit Smoothies
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All-Fruit Smoothies

Yes, it's possible to drink smoothies and still lose weight, but you have to be mindful of the type of smoothie you're making. If it's all fruit or a premade bottled version from the store, it could be a sugar bomb.

"Premade fruit smoothies sold at grocery and convenience stores are usually loaded with sugar. Drinking one or two of these smoothies per day could sabotage your weight-loss efforts," Jillian said. "To avoid the sugar shock, make your own smoothie at home. Stick to one cup of fruit then add in greens and a protein source like protein powder, and mix with unsweetened almond milk for a nutritious and delicious alternative to store-bought smoothies."

Bananas
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Bananas

"Although all fruit is very healthy, for weight loss, some higher-sugar fruits might not be the best choice," Amanda Baker Lemein, MS, RD, LDN, told POPSUGAR. This includes bananas, which can have up to 17 grams of sugar and 120 calories per large banana.

Pineapple
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Pineapple

Amanda also cautions against pineapples, which have up to 17 grams of sugar per one-cup serving.

Mangoes
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Mangoes

Mangoes, while delicious, are also higher in sugar: up to 22 grams for a one-cup serving. Juliana Shalek, MS, RD, CDN, and owner of The Nutrition Suite, said these are not the best choice if you are trying to lose weight. If you do decide to eat mango, she advises to pay attention to serving size.

Watermelon
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Watermelon

Brooke also advises to be cautious with watermelon, since it can have up to 17 grams of sugar per wedge (about one-sixth of the melon). But it's such a delicious Summer treat that you may not want to avoid it altogether; just be mindful of portion size. One cup of watermelon chunks is just nine grams of sugar.