Skip Nav
Le Creuset
Le Creuset Is Releasing 4 New Calming Colors, and We're Feeling Zen Already
Pregnancy
16 Pregnancy Products We Couldn't Live Without — Seriously!
Chelsea Clinton Pregnant With Third Child
Chelsea Clinton
Chelsea Clinton Is Expecting Baby Number 3! Read Her Sweet Announcement
Unusual Baby Names
70 Rarely Used Baby Names to Set Your Child Apart in 2019
Valentine's Day
10 Valentine's Day Products on Amazon (All Under $20)

AAP Warning Against Plastic in Microwave and Dishwasher

AAP Warns Against Putting Plastic Bottles, Sippy Cups, and Bowls in the Microwave and Dishwasher

A new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published in the August edition of Pediatrics is calling for stricter regulations surrounding food safety in the US. The AAP particularly wants to warn parents about the dangers associated with reheating several types of plastic via microwaves and dishwashers.

Experts looked at several studies and determined that "chemicals found in food colorings, preservatives, and packaging materials may harm children's health." The report listed the dangers of certain substances, like bisphenols, phthalates, and nitrates — indirect additives that are often found in foods' processing and packaging — that can be especially hazardous to infants and kids.

"We're especially concerned about significant gaps in data about the health effects of many of these chemicals on infants and children."
ADVERTISEMENT

"Since heat can cause plastics to leak BPA and phthalates into food, avoid microwaving food or beverages (including infant formula and pumped human milk) in plastic when possible," said the report. "Also try to avoid putting plastics in the dishwasher."

Currently, the FDA doesn't have the authority to retest packaging on items that have already been approved for the market, so the AAP has drummed up some ways parents can keep their children safe from these potentially harmful chemicals:

  • Buy and serve more fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables and fewer processed meats — especially during pregnancy.
  • Since heat can cause plastics to leak BPA and phthalates into food, avoid microwaving food or beverages (including infant formula and pumped human milk) in plastic when possible. Try to avoid putting plastics in the dishwasher.
  • Use alternatives to plastic — such as glass or stainless steel — when possible.
  • Avoid plastics with recycling codes 3 (phthalates), 6 (styrene), and 7 (bisphenols) unless they are labeled as "biobased" or "greenware."
  • Wash your hands thoroughly before and after touching food, and clean all fruits and vegetables that cannot be peeled.

Dr. Leonardo Trasande, MD, an AAP Council on Environmental Health member and lead author of the policy statement, said that enforcing these guidelines should be a top priority for parents.

"There are critical weaknesses in the current food additives regulatory process, which doesn't do enough to ensure all chemicals added to foods are safe enough to be part of a family's diet," he said. "As pediatricians, we're especially concerned about significant gaps in data about the health effects of many of these chemicals on infants and children."

From Our Partners
Why I Don't Care That My House Is Messy
Mountain Buggy Bagrider
How to Stop Back Talk From Kids
Big Teddy Bears For Kids 2019
The Home Edit Storage Solutions For Organizing Kid Stuff
Valentine's Day Jokes For Kids
My Son With Autism Went to College and Has a Career
Why Being a Strict Parent Can Backfire
My Parents Were So Hard on Me About Getting Good Grades
My Parents Never Gave Me the Sex Talk When I Was a Kid
Airport Hacks For Families
Should You Buy Your Kids Gifts For Valentine's Day?
From Our Partners
Latest Family
All the Latest From Ryan Reynolds