Zara’s "Skin Love" Campaign Brings Indigenous Face Tattoos to the Masses

Zara's latest beauty campaign "Skin Love" just dropped, introducing one of the more inclusive makeup lines to the market. Debuting two new complexion products, the range will feature the Limitless Soft-Matte Foundation in a whopping 51 shades and the Luminous Creamy Concealer, which will be available in 36 shades.

Beyond that, Zara's campaign imagery made diverse representation a focal point — not only showcasing models across a range of skin tones and backgrounds, but also traditional Indegenous face tattoos. One model featured in the campaign, Quannah Chasinghorse, is of Hän Gwich'in (from Alaska and Canada) and Oglala Lakota (from South Dakota) ancestry. In the photos, you can see her proudly showcasing a Yidįįłtoo, the traditional face tattoo that often represents a Hän Gwich'in girl stepping into womanhood, according to "Elle." The Indigenous practice of face and chin tattoos dates back thousands of years, but as with many indigenous customs, has been forced out of practice by "European colonizers in the 1900s," according to NPR. Chasinghorse has said herself she was apprehensive about sharing her Yidįįłtoo tattoo with the world until she got older. Now, more and more people are bringing this important part of their culture to the forefront: broadcaster Oriini Kaipara recently became the first person with a traditional facial tattoo to present mainstream television news, and TikTok user Shina Nova proudly educates on their own markings across social media.

This is the kind of inclusivity the beauty industry needs, and it's refreshing to see a large company like Zara bring this representation to the masses. While there's much more to be done for greater representation in fashion, beauty, and advertising at large, this is a step in the right direction. Take a closer look at the campaign photos ahead.

Zara/ Tyler Mitchell
Zara/ Tyler Mitchell
Zara/ Tyler Mitchell