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Sutton Foster Interview About Adoption and Motherhood
Sutton Foster
Sutton Foster's Empowering Adoption Story Proves That Becoming a Mom in Your 40s Is an Incredible Gift
What the IVF Sperm Donor Selection Process Is Really Like
Fertility
What It's Really Like to Pick Your Baby's Father Through a Donor Bank
How to Prepare For Motherhood When You've Lost Your Mother
Pregnancy
My Mom Died When I Was 6; Now My Stepmom Is Showing Me How to Love My Daughter
Transracial Adoption Experience
Personal Esssay
How Being a Transracial Adoptee Shaped — but Nearly Shattered — My Self-Identity
Choosing to Have a Baby With a Surrogate
Pregnancy
How I Came to the Difficult Decision to Have a Baby Through a Surrogate

Reasons Introvert and Extrovert Couples Make Great Parents

5 Reasons Introvert and Extrovert Couples Make Great Parents

Kids get to flush out their own identity early in life.
Image Source: Flickr user CRDrahosh

You know what old wives' tales say: opposites attract. So if you find yourself in a relationship with an extrovert when you're an introvert, or vice versa, then you're well-aware of all the benefits that come with having a partner who's the yin to your yang. And while it's no secret that agreeing on a restaurant to eat at — or whether to even go out to eat at all — can take a little longer for you compared to other couples, guess what? Partners who decide to have kids are in luck because, according to Jennifer Kahnweiler, PhD, a public speaker and author of The Introverted Leader and The Genius of Opposites, there is a multitude of pros for children who are raised by one parent who's an introvert and another who falls directly into the extrovert category.

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