Skip Nav
Weight Loss
Screw the Scale! These 15 Women Share Nonscale Victories That Mean So Much More
Workouts
What Exercises Burn the Most Belly Fat? These 20 (and Here's a 40-Minute HIIT Workout Using Them)
Workouts
We Asked Experts What the Best Exercises For Fat-Burning Are — Here's What They Said
Healthy Living Tips
These 12 Wellness Products Can Be Yours in Just 2 Days, Thanks to Amazon!
Wellness
This Is the Year I'm De-Stressing Like a Wellness Expert, Starting With These 13 Items

Can Apple Cider Vinegar Be Heated?

Does Apple Cider Vinegar Still Work If It's Heated?

You've been taking apple cider vinegar (ACV) for a while now. It's not the most pleasant part of your day, but with possible weight-loss benefits, improved digestion, boosted immunity, and the fact that it's rich in vitamins E, A, and P and minerals such as magnesium, iron, and calcium, you're happily sipping it down. But are you taking it all wrong?

Many people pour ACV into their tea or in hot water with lemon to cut the strong flavor, but does heating ACV ruin its benefits? We've enlisted the expertise of two nutritionists — Stephanie Clarke, RD, and Willow Jarosh, RD, of C&J Nutrition to answer this burning (pun intended!) question.

They share that the helpful bacteria in ACV are known as acetobacter and lactic acid. Research shows that the acetobacter "thermal death point" is 125-129 °F (for reference, the temperature of boiling water is 212 °F). The good news is those bacterial strains need to be kept at the thermal death point temperature for longer periods of time to kill the bacteria (10 minutes).

ADVERTISEMENT

Stephanie and Willow say, "If you poured boiling water into a mug and stirred in apple cider vinegar, the temperature of the water would decrease pretty rapidly. So, there would probably still be live bacteria present, but the population would likely be greatly reduced. If you boiled water with ACV in it for longer than 10 minutes, you'd likely kill the bacteria, so you definitely want to avoid that. Both dietitians suggest preserving as many live/active bacteria as possible, by pouring ACV into cool or warm water, not in your boiling water when making tea. Here are some ACV drink recipes you can try.

From Our Partners
Low-Carb Slow-Cooker Recipes
Coffee-Mate Oat Milk Creamer
Fitness Tracker Jewelry
New Year's Resolution Memes
Whole30 at Starbucks
Best Water Bottles 2019
Food Trends 2019
Simple Low-Carb Meal Prep Ideas
Weighted Blankets That Keep You Cool
HPV Vaccine Expanded: Gardasil 9 Approved For Up to Age 45
Can You Eat Cheese on the Keto Diet?
Foods to Help You Sleep
From Our Partners
Latest Fitness
All the Latest From Ryan Reynolds