Skip Nav
Food News
Friendly Announcement: Taco Bell's $1 Nacho Fries Will Be Back Soon!
Reese's Bouquets 2019
Valentine's Day
Walmart Is Selling a Reese's Bouquet, So I Know What I Want For Valentine's Day
Original Recipes
The Only Instant Pot Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe You'll Ever Need
Whole Foods
23 Whole Foods Staples For Busy People
OREO
Most Stuf Oreos Are Here, and We Can't Even Fully Articulate How Massive They Are

How Long to Let Meat Rest

Are You Committing This Cardinal Meat-Cookery Sin?

What do a roast leg of lamb, braised beef brisket, and broiled chicken thighs all have in common, besides that a vegetarian won't go near them? They all need to rest after cooking, unless you relish tucking into dry, stringy meat. The why is a little complicated, but basically, if you cut into a piece of meat right after pulling it from the heat source it'll expel much more of its flavorful juices onto the cutting board (not into your mouth) than if you allow it to rest five to 30 minutes, depending on the cut.

The specifics:

  • Let smaller cuts of meat like a chicken breast or thigh, a lamb chop, or a thin steak like hangar or skirt rest for five to 10 minutes.
  • Let medium cuts of meat like a porterhouse steak or a thick-cut pork chop rest for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Let large cuts of meat like a leg of lamb, pork shoulder, brisket, crown roast, whole chicken, duck, or turkey rest 15 to 30 minutes (longer for larger cuts).
Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Anna Monette Roberts / Nicole Perry
From Our Partners
How to Use an Instant Pot
How to Reheat a HoneyBaked Ham
How Chefs Make Gravy
Slow Cooker to Instant Pot Conversion
How to Cook Zucchini Noodles
How to Tell If a Turkey Is Done Without a Thermometer
How to Get Crispy Turkey Skin
The Right Way to Cook Things
Easy Meal Prep Ideas
How to Cook a Perfect Steak
How to Eat Healthy If You Are Busy
Best Grocery List For Someone on a Budget
From Our Partners
Latest Recipes, Menus, Food & Wine
All the Latest From Ryan Reynolds